Si Me Dan Pasteles

by Alejandro Jimenez

Text is taken from Music K-8 magazine.

 

Download QuickTime.

 

SI ME DAN PASTELES looks harder than it is. A few times through it, and you will see that the music offers no real difficulties. The lyrics are another story. If you are fortunate enough to have Spanish-speaking assistance (teachers, students, parents) with the pronunciation, invite their help. If you need more help, a general pronunciation guide is given on page 40. Even better, at the end of the second side of the P/A Cassette, there is a spoken guide for the lyrics. Each phrase is slowly stated twice in rhythm, once for listening and once for repeating.

As with most folk music, this arrangement is a starting point for a group, and may be customized to your needs. Sing it unison or 2-part, and add the ostinato as you wish. If you have access to Orff instruments, a string bass or bass guitar, the lowest part(s) may be played instead of sung. The percussion parts are easy yet authentic, and might give you the chance to involve a reluctant singer who would love to play the conga or cowbell. Import a member of the band or orchestra, or a piano or percussion student to handle the percussion parts if need be. The interlude may be played by recorders, sung, or both. An all-instrumental verse is quite effective.

Performance possibilities are varied and include using the piece as a processional or recessional (as if the singers are moving toward or away from your "village") to open or close a winter concert. A strolling group coming into an auditorium might include the portable percussion instruments and guitar, with piano on the stage playing quietly.

To end the song - 1. Repeat either the piano introduction (with percussion) or the interlude; 2. Sing the first verse once or more after the final interlude and gradually fade out, as if the strollers are moving beyond earshot; 3. Recess out of the concert space, repeating the first verse or two until all are out of sight. As on the cassette, you may add a final E minor chord at the end.

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